Archaeological News: Infected and Hunched: King Richard III Was Crawling With Roundworms 

archaeologicalnews:

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William Shakespeare depicted King Richard III as a crooked ruler, due to the monarch’s supposed ruthless demeanor and his curved spine. A new study suggests that in addition to scoliosis, Richard III suffered from a roundworm infection.

Interest and research into the monarch has spiked since…

Overcoming looting and years of war, Iraq Museum moves to reopen 

archaeologistforhire:

archaeologicalnews:

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Lamia al-Gailani pulls a folder of crumbling letters from a battered metal cabinet – part of what she considers the secret treasures of the Iraq Museum.

The cabinets hold archives from the beginnings of the venerable institution, established after World War I by Gertrude Bell, the famed…

Yaaaaay

oosik:

edificiosmayas:

themalleable:

Afred Maudslay en Chichén-Itzá ( año 1889 )

Chichen Itza, 1889

Comparing modern and historic photographs is my favorite (2012). Chichen Itza looks way more manicured now.

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National Geographic Channel Pulls ‘Nazi War Diggers’ Series 

Authorities Confiscate Archaeological Pieces from Cusco Stores 

archaeologyrocks101:

Archaeologists find 3,000-year-old graves in Cusco, Peru 

archaeologicalnews:

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Excavators working in the city of Cusco have discovered a burial site containing five individuals from the Marcavalle culture, a pre-Inca society.

Andina news agency reports that the skeletal remains date back to around 1,000 BC. The burial site, which contained…

atlasobscura:

CappadociaNevşehir Province, Turkey

Located in the Central Anatolian region of Turkey, Cappadocia is an area where entire cities have been carved into rock.

An area with history so abundant and far reaching as to render entire centuries as footnotes at first glance, the landscape appears as an abandoned alien desert with fields that look like waves frozen in time, and rocky spikes and spires protruding from the landscape like some sort of meringue set in stone.

However on further exploration through small, winding paths, beautifully-carved homes and churches are waiting to be discovered.

The rock formations that make up Cappadocia were created by volcanic eruptions, erosion, and wind. Over three million years ago a volcanic eruption deposited a blanket of ash across the 1500 square mile landscape which formed into a soft rock. This rock, slowly eaten away by wind and time, has created some spectacular forms. But the human history of the area is as compelling as the geological one.

For so much more on Cappadocia, keep reading on Atlas Obscura…

theolduvaigorge:

Interdisciplinary Research on the Moravian Upper Palaeolithic in the New Millennium (2001–2013)

  • by Ondřej Mlejnek

A number of new works concerning the Moravian Upper Palaeolithic have appeared over the last thirteen years. This thematic review presents an overview of Upper Palaeolithic excavations conducted in the third millennium in Moravia and all major works on this topic. The review is structured chronologically, it begins with the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition (technocomplexes of Szeletian and Bohunician), continues with Early Upper Palaeolithic (Aurignacian) and Middle Upper Palaeolithic (Gravettian or Pavlovian) and ends with the Late Upper Palaeolithic (technocomplexes of Epigravettian and Magdalenian). The works which are not connected with any particular period, such as papers discussing raw materials, settlement strategies, regional overviews of the Palaeolithic settlement or synthesis, are mentioned in the last chapter. The main aim of this thematic review is to present recent results of research into the Moravian Upper Palaeolithic to a foreign audience” (read more/open access).

(Open access source: Interdisciplinaria Archaeologica, Natural Sciences in Archaeology 4(2), 2013 via Academia.edu) 

historyechoes:

A Picture of Serpent Mound. It is pretty amazing from above. I posted a map of the park yesterday with a little info. I still have not been. Now on my To Do list. To plan your visit: http://arcofappalachia.org/visit/serpent-mound-earthworks.html

historyechoes:

A Picture of Serpent Mound. It is pretty amazing from above. I posted a map of the park yesterday with a little info. I still have not been. Now on my To Do list. To plan your visit: http://arcofappalachia.org/visit/serpent-mound-earthworks.html

ancient-egypts-secrets:

The Aswan Dam: During its construction in the 1960s, the Aswan Dam held back greater amounts of water each year. As the water rose, many important archaeological sites were flooded, such as these sphinxes lining the avenue of the Temple at Wadi es-Sebua. In 1964, the sphinxes and temple were rescued and put on higher ground.

ancient-egypts-secrets:

The Aswan Dam: During its construction in the 1960s, the Aswan Dam held back greater amounts of water each year. As the water rose, many important archaeological sites were flooded, such as these sphinxes lining the avenue of the Temple at Wadi es-Sebua. In 1964, the sphinxes and temple were rescued and put on higher ground.

ancientart:

A remarkably preserved Roman coffin, and a child’s shoe found within it. Excavated by Wessex Archaeology at Boscombe Down, Wiltshire, England. 

This burial is the earliest in its cemetery, and dates to around 220 AD. Later burials are clustered around it.

When the archaeologists lifted the lid of this stone coffin, they were surprised to find that it had not been filled with soil. Instead was the skeleton of a woman cradling in her arms a young child. Check out this video if you’re interested in seeing the part of the excavation.

Of the items in the coffin, the child’s leather shoe (pictured) survived. Laces that strapped the shoe can be clearly seen, as well as the holes for stitching the shoe together. The woman’s deer skin slippers also survived.

"The preservation of the shoes is remarkable. Because the processes of decay were quite slow we also have traces of cloth that have been preserved by a chemical reaction with the metal bangle. We even have traces of the puparia from which the coffin flies that infested the body hatched. Squeamish but fascinating!"

-Dr Andrew Fitzpatrick of Wessex Archaeology

Photos courtesy Wessex Archaeology.

archaeochick:

archaeoblogs:

What archaeologists can (but usually don’t) do to help reduce and regulate the illicit trade in cultural objectsSource: http://bit.ly/1k6SYFC
Last night, when I was a bit distracted, a story I posted on twitter and some comments I made spun into a forked debate: 1) how can archaeologists modify and change the way our profession is presented in the popular press and 2) what can archaeologists do to aid research into the illicit antiquities trade. I, of course, was interested in the second. Although twitter is certainly not the place to grumble about such things, I made a series of tweets decrying archaeological complacency when it comes to a massive swath of transnational crime that just happens to threaten our livelihoods. I asserted………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

This article actually answers a question I had earlier about the ethics of helping treasure hunters. Actually pretty important points are made, too!

archaeochick:

archaeoblogs:

What archaeologists can (but usually don’t) do to help reduce and regulate the illicit trade in cultural objects
Source: http://bit.ly/1k6SYFC

Last night, when I was a bit distracted, a story I posted on twitter and some comments I made spun into a forked debate: 1) how can archaeologists modify and change the way our profession is presented in the popular press and 2) what can archaeologists do to aid research into the illicit antiquities trade. I, of course, was interested in the second. Although twitter is certainly not the place to grumble about such things, I made a series of tweets decrying archaeological complacency when it comes to a massive swath of transnational crime that just happens to threaten our livelihoods. I asserted………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

This article actually answers a question I had earlier about the ethics of helping treasure hunters. Actually pretty important points are made, too!

Decline of bronze age 'megacities' linked to climate change 

Mummy Murder Mystery Solved: Incan Woman’s Head Smashed 

archaeologicalnews:

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A mysterious mummy that languished in German collections for more than a century is that of an Incan woman killed by blunt-force trauma to the head, new research reveals.

A new analysis shows that the mummy was once an Incan woman who also suffered from a parasitic disease that thickens the heart and intestinal walls, raising the possibility that she was killed in a ritual murder because she was already on the brink of death.

The story began in the 1890s, when Princess Therese of Bavaria acquired two mummies during a trip to South America. One was soon lost, but the other somehow made its way to the Bavarian State Archaeological Collection in Munich. Read more.

rare-shots:

The first photo following the discovery of Machu Pichu in 1912.

I hate to be knit-picky, but I’m gonna do it anyway, because the history of Machu Picchu as an archaeological site/site of European interest is fascinating.Machu Picchu wasn’t discovered in the least, in fact, before Hiram Bingham was shown where it was (by a Quechua guide, to whom it was old hat), there are at least five other (white/European) people that may or may not have already interacted with the site, nevermind that it was a well known place to locals Quechua people (some of whom had repurposed site materials for their homes). While the Spanish supposedly weren’t aware of the site, a few German and English visitors were. Bingham was looking for Vilcabamba (by the way, that’s in Ecuador~), and wouldn’t have ‘found’ Machu Picchhu if not for his guides blatantly pointing it out. The ‘cleaning up’ and essential looting of the site by Bingham’s team remains a point of contention between Peru and Yale. Also, he though it was a temple of the Virgins of The Sun, probably after osteologist George Eaton categorized skeletal remains from the site as most all female. In 2000, that was debunked by modern osteological knowledge of variation in height and size of Inca male individuals as compared to the way osteologists primarily learned from white/Euro skeletal remains (remains were nearly 50/50 male/female).Here are some sources, also the wiki page is sourced well.

rare-shots:

The first photo following the discovery of Machu Pichu in 1912.

I hate to be knit-picky, but I’m gonna do it anyway, because the history of Machu Picchu as an archaeological site/site of European interest is fascinating.

Machu Picchu wasn’t discovered in the least, in fact, before Hiram Bingham was shown where it was (by a Quechua guide, to whom it was old hat), there are at least five other (white/European) people that may or may not have already interacted with the site, nevermind that it was a well known place to locals Quechua people (some of whom had repurposed site materials for their homes). While the Spanish supposedly weren’t aware of the site, a few German and English visitors were. Bingham was looking for Vilcabamba (by the way, that’s in Ecuador~), and wouldn’t have ‘found’ Machu Picchhu if not for his guides blatantly pointing it out.

The ‘cleaning up’ and essential looting of the site by Bingham’s team remains a point of contention between Peru and Yale. Also, he though it was a temple of the Virgins of The Sun, probably after osteologist George Eaton categorized skeletal remains from the site as most all female. In 2000, that was debunked by modern osteological knowledge of variation in height and size of Inca male individuals as compared to the way osteologists primarily learned from white/Euro skeletal remains (remains were nearly 50/50 male/female).

Here are some sources, also the wiki page is sourced well.