crotalinae:

avianawareness:

As they grow, young birds subsisting on white bread and other inappropriate food sources can develop issues preventing their bones from forming normally, resulting in angel wing. (via Feeding White Bread to Wild Birds is Killing Them | One Green Planet)

In general feeding wildlife is bad, and that includes birds, if you’re going to feed wildlife make sure what you’re doing is not hurting the animal, and be sure it is legal where you are located as many parks ban the feeding of waterfowl/pigeons to try to avoid negative human/bird interactions and keep the park cleaner.
The article has great suggestions for better alternatives:
“Nutritious waterfowl feed or duck pellets are inexpensive, easy to carry, and can be purchased at most feed stores. Seedless grapes cut in half, shredded kale, Swiss chard or romaine lettuce, and grains, including wheat, barley and oats, are all healthy food sources that will appeal to most waterfowl. Make sure anything you feed is bite-sized to avoid choking hazards.”

crotalinae:

avianawareness:

As they grow, young birds subsisting on white bread and other inappropriate food sources can develop issues preventing their bones from forming normally, resulting in angel wing. (via Feeding White Bread to Wild Birds is Killing Them | One Green Planet)

In general feeding wildlife is bad, and that includes birds, if you’re going to feed wildlife make sure what you’re doing is not hurting the animal, and be sure it is legal where you are located as many parks ban the feeding of waterfowl/pigeons to try to avoid negative human/bird interactions and keep the park cleaner.

The article has great suggestions for better alternatives:

Nutritious waterfowl feed or duck pellets are inexpensive, easy to carry, and can be purchased at most feed stores. Seedless grapes cut in half, shredded kale, Swiss chard or romaine lettuce, and grains, including wheat, barley and oats, are all healthy food sources that will appeal to most waterfowl. Make sure anything you feed is bite-sized to avoid choking hazards.”

Australia's Shark Cull Is Killing the Wrong Sharks 

kazuha159:

flashinglightsandecstasy:

musicalbunny:

I think this is necessary to post. I see a lot of people “saving” bunnies.

"*Bunnies are one of the most frequently “kidnapped” mammal species.*Mothers dig a very shallow nest in the ground that is easily uncovered when mowing or raking the yard. If you find a rabbit nest-leave it alone!!*Mother rabbits only return to the nest two or three times a day, usually before dawn and right after dusk. *To determine if they are orphaned, either place a string across the nest in a tic-tac-toe shape or circle the nest with flour. Check the nest the next day. If the string or flour is disturbed, the mother has returned. If not, take the bunnies to a rehabilitator.* A bunny that is bright eyed and 4-5 inches long is fully independent and does NOT need to be rescued!*If you find a bunny that does need to be rescued, put it in a dark, quiet location. Bunnies are a prey species and while they may look calm, they are actually very, very scared!”


Never knew this, keeping this for reference

As a student of Veterinary Medicine I can completely confirm this! Do NOT take them out of their nest unless you’re 100% sure that the mother did not come back for them after at least one day!

kazuha159:

flashinglightsandecstasy:

musicalbunny:

I think this is necessary to post. I see a lot of people “saving” bunnies.

"*Bunnies are one of the most frequently “kidnapped” mammal species.
*Mothers dig a very shallow nest in the ground that is easily uncovered when mowing or raking the yard. If you find a rabbit nest-leave it alone!!
*Mother rabbits only return to the nest two or three times a day, usually before dawn and right after dusk. 
*To determine if they are orphaned, either place a string across the nest in a tic-tac-toe shape or circle the nest with flour. Check the nest the next day. If the string or flour is disturbed, the mother has returned. If not, take the bunnies to a rehabilitator.
* A bunny that is bright eyed and 4-5 inches long is fully independent and does NOT need to be rescued!
*If you find a bunny that does need to be rescued, put it in a dark, quiet location. Bunnies are a prey species and while they may look calm, they are actually very, very scared!”

Never knew this, keeping this for reference

As a student of Veterinary Medicine I can completely confirm this! Do NOT take them out of their nest unless you’re 100% sure that the mother did not come back for them after at least one day!

theolduvaigorge:

Time running out for rarest primate


Rescue bid launched to save Hainan gibbon from becoming first ape driven to extinction by humans.


by Daniel Cressey
“China’s wildlife conservation efforts are under scrutiny as scientists battle to save a species found only in a tiny corner of an island in the South China Sea. The Hainan gibbon is the world’s rarest primate and its long-term survival is in jeopardy, according to an analysis.
Only 23 to 25 of the animals are thought to remain, clustered in less than 20 square kilometres of forest in China’s Hainan Island. The species (Nomascus hainanus), which numbered more than 2,000 in the late 1950s, has been devastated through the destruction of habitat from logging, and by poaching. Extinction would give the gibbon the unwelcome distinction of being the first ape to be wiped out because of human actions. To hammer out a plan to save it, international primate researchers convened an emergency summit in Hainan last month.
“With the right conservation management, it is still possible to conserve and recover the Hainan gibbon population,” says meeting co-chair Samuel Turvey, who studies animal extinctions at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL). “But given the current highly perilous state of the species, we cannot afford to wait any longer before initiating a more proactive and coordinated recovery programme.” He adds that the meeting was a successful first step towards saving the animal and that a plan of action is being finalized.
The plan will be based in part on a ‘population viability analysis’ that models the potential size of the gibbon population in coming decades for a range of different scenarios. It is being drawn up by Kathy Traylor Holzer, a conservation planner at the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group in Apple Valley, Minnesota. “It’s one of the smallest populations I’ve ever worked with,” says Traylor Holzer. “That number — in one place — is extremely scary.”
Preliminary modelling, which considers factors such as breeding success, habitat changes and natural threats, suggests that the Hainan gibbon may be safe from extinction in the next couple of decades. But its restricted habitat means that a single catastrophic event, such as a typhoon or a disease outbreak, could wipe out the minuscule population. Furthermore, low genetic diversity in the remaining animals could result in unhealthy offspring because of inbreeding. To better understand the genetics of the animals, ZSL researchers are conducting DNA sequencing using collected faeces" (read more).
(Source: Nature)

theolduvaigorge:

Time running out for rarest primate

Rescue bid launched to save Hainan gibbon from becoming first ape driven to extinction by humans.

  • by Daniel Cressey

China’s wildlife conservation efforts are under scrutiny as scientists battle to save a species found only in a tiny corner of an island in the South China Sea. The Hainan gibbon is the world’s rarest primate and its long-term survival is in jeopardy, according to an analysis.

Only 23 to 25 of the animals are thought to remain, clustered in less than 20 square kilometres of forest in China’s Hainan Island. The species (Nomascus hainanus), which numbered more than 2,000 in the late 1950s, has been devastated through the destruction of habitat from logging, and by poaching. Extinction would give the gibbon the unwelcome distinction of being the first ape to be wiped out because of human actions. To hammer out a plan to save it, international primate researchers convened an emergency summit in Hainan last month.

“With the right conservation management, it is still possible to conserve and recover the Hainan gibbon population,” says meeting co-chair Samuel Turvey, who studies animal extinctions at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL). “But given the current highly perilous state of the species, we cannot afford to wait any longer before initiating a more proactive and coordinated recovery programme.” He adds that the meeting was a successful first step towards saving the animal and that a plan of action is being finalized.

The plan will be based in part on a ‘population viability analysis’ that models the potential size of the gibbon population in coming decades for a range of different scenarios. It is being drawn up by Kathy Traylor Holzer, a conservation planner at the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group in Apple Valley, Minnesota. “It’s one of the smallest populations I’ve ever worked with,” says Traylor Holzer. “That number — in one place — is extremely scary.”

Preliminary modelling, which considers factors such as breeding success, habitat changes and natural threats, suggests that the Hainan gibbon may be safe from extinction in the next couple of decades. But its restricted habitat means that a single catastrophic event, such as a typhoon or a disease outbreak, could wipe out the minuscule population. Furthermore, low genetic diversity in the remaining animals could result in unhealthy offspring because of inbreeding. To better understand the genetics of the animals, ZSL researchers are conducting DNA sequencing using collected faeces" (read more).

(Source: Nature)

anxiouswren:

I’m back! I have an MFA degree and a sunburn from a wonderful week in Disneyworld, and I am looking forward to all that life offers a bird-crazy illustrator!

I have posted a few of these, but I thought it would make sense to have them all in one post. This is the result of my final project for my MFA—a series of recently extinct birds.  Someday I hope I can make this into a full-fledged (pun unintended) book! It was a great learning experience and I look forward to continuing work on it.

tentree:

Leave nothing but footprints.
Take nothing but pictures.
Kill nothing but time.
www.tentree.com

tentree:

Leave nothing but footprints.

Take nothing but pictures.

Kill nothing but time.

www.tentree.com

ancient-egypts-secrets:

The Aswan Dam: During its construction in the 1960s, the Aswan Dam held back greater amounts of water each year. As the water rose, many important archaeological sites were flooded, such as these sphinxes lining the avenue of the Temple at Wadi es-Sebua. In 1964, the sphinxes and temple were rescued and put on higher ground.

ancient-egypts-secrets:

The Aswan Dam: During its construction in the 1960s, the Aswan Dam held back greater amounts of water each year. As the water rose, many important archaeological sites were flooded, such as these sphinxes lining the avenue of the Temple at Wadi es-Sebua. In 1964, the sphinxes and temple were rescued and put on higher ground.

scienceyoucanlove:

PLEASE check out this AMAZING photographer, Ami Vitale (click her name to link to her facebook) and her work to bridge gaps between cultures and save the critically endangered animals in between. Also it’s the final day for her IndieVoices campaign so please consider supporting it! It’s only $1545 away from the stretch goal. Click here to learn more about it: https://indievoic.es/projects/project_home/36/D

Oh and don’t forget to follow her here on tumblr

It’s extremely fucked up that people are concerned/amused by the obesity and subsequent ~weight loss regime~ of Oshine, a female orangutan in captivity in the UK, when her physical condition was due to being raised as a pet with living conditions and a diet unfit for her, then sloughed off because she was not manageable in her maturity 

Why I Believe In Zoos 

thejunglenook:

mizzkatonic:

image

@liceham my anger in this reply is in no way aimed at you! I am super grateful you gave me a reason to write down some of my thoughts on this subject, and I love that you’re informing your own opinions. I think you’re great!

I’m really sorry this took me so long to reply to; I have a lot of…

Everyone should take a few minutes to read this post.

Does anyone know the immunization necessary for pallas cats/handlers of pallas cats in captivity? I know they require very minimal human interaction and don’t often thrive in zoo settings. I haven’t much read up on it but I was wondering if anyone had any experience with or has done any research. 

conservationbiologist:

Lecture ‘Applied nutrition’: conservation status -> malnutrition -> effect on reproduction. Need pictures of overweight lemurs at zoos..
Obesity in Captive Lemurs
The problem of obesity in captive lemurs

conservationbiologist:

Lecture ‘Applied nutrition’: conservation status -> malnutrition -> effect on reproduction. Need pictures of overweight lemurs at zoos..

rare-shots:

The first photo following the discovery of Machu Pichu in 1912.

I hate to be knit-picky, but I’m gonna do it anyway, because the history of Machu Picchu as an archaeological site/site of European interest is fascinating.Machu Picchu wasn’t discovered in the least, in fact, before Hiram Bingham was shown where it was (by a Quechua guide, to whom it was old hat), there are at least five other (white/European) people that may or may not have already interacted with the site, nevermind that it was a well known place to locals Quechua people (some of whom had repurposed site materials for their homes). While the Spanish supposedly weren’t aware of the site, a few German and English visitors were. Bingham was looking for Vilcabamba (by the way, that’s in Ecuador~), and wouldn’t have ‘found’ Machu Picchhu if not for his guides blatantly pointing it out. The ‘cleaning up’ and essential looting of the site by Bingham’s team remains a point of contention between Peru and Yale. Also, he though it was a temple of the Virgins of The Sun, probably after osteologist George Eaton categorized skeletal remains from the site as most all female. In 2000, that was debunked by modern osteological knowledge of variation in height and size of Inca male individuals as compared to the way osteologists primarily learned from white/Euro skeletal remains (remains were nearly 50/50 male/female).Here are some sources, also the wiki page is sourced well.

rare-shots:

The first photo following the discovery of Machu Pichu in 1912.

I hate to be knit-picky, but I’m gonna do it anyway, because the history of Machu Picchu as an archaeological site/site of European interest is fascinating.

Machu Picchu wasn’t discovered in the least, in fact, before Hiram Bingham was shown where it was (by a Quechua guide, to whom it was old hat), there are at least five other (white/European) people that may or may not have already interacted with the site, nevermind that it was a well known place to locals Quechua people (some of whom had repurposed site materials for their homes). While the Spanish supposedly weren’t aware of the site, a few German and English visitors were. Bingham was looking for Vilcabamba (by the way, that’s in Ecuador~), and wouldn’t have ‘found’ Machu Picchhu if not for his guides blatantly pointing it out.

The ‘cleaning up’ and essential looting of the site by Bingham’s team remains a point of contention between Peru and Yale. Also, he though it was a temple of the Virgins of The Sun, probably after osteologist George Eaton categorized skeletal remains from the site as most all female. In 2000, that was debunked by modern osteological knowledge of variation in height and size of Inca male individuals as compared to the way osteologists primarily learned from white/Euro skeletal remains (remains were nearly 50/50 male/female).

Here are some sources, also the wiki page is sourced well.

jtotheizzoe:

Stop The Western Australia Shark Cull

In response to a handful of fatal shark bites over the past several years, the government of Western Australia has launched a multi-million dollar effort to systematically catch and killing sharks, allegedly “protect the people of Western Australia”. This is in direct opposition to Australia’s existing Shark Recovery Plan. I guess when you call something a “cull” it’s supposed to sound more acceptable than “indiscriminate killing of a keystone ocean species.”

Today I join with thousands around the world (what up, Ricky Gervais?) to say that this must stop. This is not supported by science. Hundreds of marine biologists agree.

More than 100 million sharks are killed per year, for food and fear, pushing many of them, like the great white, to the brink of extinction. Meanwhile, you could count the number of fatal shark attacks every year on one hand.

You have a 1 in 3,700,000 chance of dying from a shark biting you. In contrast, you have a 1 in 63 chance of dying from the flu. Shark bites are a rare event, and fatal ones are astronomically rare. Sharks don’t actually attack humans, this is an invented term that implies that sharks are out to get people. They are not. “Rogue sharks,” those that specifically seek out humans for food, are a myth. Sharks are apex predators who keep ecosystems healthy and keep food webs in balance, all the way down to the plant level.

Instead of killing sharks, we should be using this money to study them, to track their behavior and migrations, or even to install automatic alert and surveillance systems. 

See that photo above, under mine? That’s the WA cull’s first victim, a tiger shark, being dispatched this week. The cull is wrong on many levels, but it took four shots with that .22 to kill the shark, and that is adding greater inhumanity to an inhumane act. 

Join me in calling for an end to the Western Australia shark cull. Download the #noWAsharkcull sign here, add your face to the thousands protesting this cull, and tag your photos with #nosharkcull and #noWAsharkcull.

You can find more information on shark conservation at Support Our Sharks and there’s a petition in place on Change.org

We can make a difference!