valdanderthal:

Four methods of trepanation found in Andahuaylas, Peru-

Chanka culture, Late Intermediate Period 

Kurin, Danielle. 2012. The Bioarchaeology of Collapse: Ethnogenesis and Ethnocide in Post-Imperial Andahuaylas, Peru. Unpublished PhD dissertation. Vanderbilt University 

catafalques:

pre-columbian peruvian skulls (owned by the DoD…) at the nmhm, silver spring, MD. 

bone-lust:

The human head, from left to right: Brain Tissue - Pia Mater - Arachnoid Mater - Dura Mater - Bone - Periosteum - Scalp

bone-lust:

The human head, from left to right: Brain Tissue - Pia Mater - Arachnoid Mater - Dura Mater - Bone - Periosteum - Scalp

deeptalkswithmonica:

dingdongyouarewrong:

frigiddykebitchcuntmanabuser2k14:

parents who vaccinate their children without their consent are terrible parents, no exceptions.

parents who let their children die of completely preventable diseases because they think 8 year olds are capable of making their own medical decisions are terrible parents. no exceptions

parents who willingly allow other people die of completely preventable diseases because they feel it is not important to vaccinate their own children for the contribution to herd immunity it provides are terrible parents and terrible people. no exceptions.

#i wanted to stay within the post format for style effect but here is some more information about that: #1. some people are unable to be vaccinated due to immune system problems etc #and are therefore at an extreme risk for contracting normally vaccinatable diseases #2. when the marjority of a population is immunized against a contagious disease it affords a degree of protection #to individuals who are not immunized #therefore people who are fully immunocompetent and able to be vaccinated absolutely should be without exception #because the more people who are vaccinated #the better shot everyone has of fighting the disease #it is the obligation of the immunocompetent to provide their share of immunity to the herd and protect those who are at risk

The Council of Foreign Relations Global Health Program has an interactive world map showing some of the outbreaks of preventable diseases traced back to anti-vaccination campaigning.

strangebiology:

Mütter museum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Over 25,00 specimens inhabit the Mütter museum, showcasing human mutations, injuries, and abnormalities. Thomas Mütter, a surgeon, collected abnormal and unique specimens in an effort to show his students the wide variety in human bodies. He donated his collection of 1,300 anatomical and pathological materials to a museum that opened in 1863.

Included here is a 70-pound ovarian cyst, skulls affected by syphilis, a stone fetus, and more. All of these existed inside living, breathing humans, as you see them, testaments to the fragility of humans and their development.

imustbemrbloggins:

Trepanation (also trephination) as seen in paleopathological research from around the world. Many of these examples show extensive evidence of healing, meaning that the individual lived after the procedure. This is considered to be one of the oldest medical practices in human history, originating at least 9/10,000 years ago.

Skeletons in the cupboard of medical science | University of Cambridge 

In museums and galleries throughout the capitals of Europe, young men who embarked on the Grand Tour gazed at artistic representations of the human body in paintings, waxworks, and sculptures. Popular were the ‘Skeletons of Malefactors’ on display at the University of Leiden. Wax figures known as Venuses, found in Felice Fontana’s Florentine workshop, are mentioned in many letters and journals recounting travellers’ formative experiences. Grand tourists may well have also visited brothels where, well away from the confines of home, they would have gained (or expanded on) their early sexual experiences.

Research suggests that many young travellers also went to see smaller and less celebrated museums that displayed representations of human anatomy in the shape of skeletons (obtained by rendering down corpses), pickled body parts, and wax models of the body created to show with detailed accuracy the internal organs.

“My research explores the material side of human anatomy and the variety of spaces where new techniques and forms were developed.  The ways in which self-proclaimed experts were beginning to develop ingenious ideas for teaching and experimentation are an important part of this story,” said Carlyle. “They can be described as tinkerers or technicians who toiled away in workshops, but they also undertook forms of public outreach that contributed to their growing social authority.”

Particularly intriguing is the story of one Mademoiselle Biheron, a middle class Parisian who became famous for her anatomical wax models. Born in 1719, Biheron was a self-trained anatomist and entrepreneur whose museum, or ‘cabinet of curiosities’, in her house near the Sorbonne was an established, if slightly off-beat, stopping point for visitors to the capital. In a craft dominated by men, Mlle Biheron was highly unusual in being a woman. [read more]

Ancient cranial surgery: bioarchaeologist studies trepanation 

valdanderthal:

archaeologicalnews:

image

Cranial surgery is tricky business, even under 21st-century conditions (think aseptic environment, specialized surgical instruments and copious amounts of pain medication both during and afterward).

However, evidence shows that healers in Peru practiced trepanation—a surgical procedure that…

THIS IS THE WOMAN I WORKED WITH ALL SUMMER AND AM WORKING TO PUBLISH AN ARTICLE WITH IN THE NEXT YEAR! *READ AND REBLOG*!!!

dead-men-talking:

scienceyoucanlove:


A Pen That 3-D Prints Bone Right Onto Patients


The device could eventually let surgeons apply stem cells more directly 

By Colin Lecher




One of the greatest promises of 3-D printing is that we’ll one day be able to print organs on-demand. Need a new liver? There it is, at the push of a button.
Anticipating that future, scientists from the University of Wollongong in Australia have created the BioPen, a tool that lets physicians more or less draw new bones on peoplethrough 3-D printing. The pen is loaded with so-called “stem cell ink,” a batch of human cells that can form new bone. Another second substance, a polymer, then seals the area so the stem cells can do their work in peace. You can see why this is promising: if someone loses parts of bone in an accident, a tool like this pen could apply a fix directly to the problem area.
We’ve seen 3-D printed bones before, actually, but this device could give a little more precision. It’s yet to undergo clinical testing, so it still may be a while before it hits the market, but if and when it does, it’ll have some company. 
source 





WHAT THE SAM HILL

dead-men-talking:

scienceyoucanlove:

A Pen That 3-D Prints Bone Right Onto Patients

The device could eventually let surgeons apply stem cells more directly 

WHAT THE SAM HILL

moshita:

Men looking at an xray of a skeleton, 1868
Bernard Hoffman
LIFE Magazine

moshita:

Men looking at an xray of a skeleton, 1868

Bernard Hoffman

LIFE Magazine

thechirurgeonsapprentice:

Tertiary syphilitic ulceration of the scalp (19th century). 

thechirurgeonsapprentice:

Tertiary syphilitic ulceration of the scalp (19th century). 

medicalschool:

World AIDS Day, December 1st

World AIDS Day, observed on 1 December every year, is dedicated to raising awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection. Government and health officials observe the day, often with speeches or forums on the AIDS topics.

Screenshots from Interactive World AIDS Day 2013 Infographic by CNN

Source: UK’s National AIDS Trust, WHO, UNAIDS, amfAR, CDC
EDITORIAL: BRYONY JONES

GRAPHIC: CNNI DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT

No copyright infringement intended, rights reserved to respective owners.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP