chiefteachesanatomy:

Ground Bone Prep
Tissue: BoneSpace (Inside of circle): Haversian/Central CanalSpace (Dark flat spaces within lamellae): LacunaeCell (Same spot as Lacunae): Osteocyte *only occupied in a living cellStructure (Complete circle): OsteonStructure (Inner rings):  LamellaeStructure (Branches from canal):   Canaliculi 

chiefteachesanatomy:

Ground Bone Prep

Tissue: Bone
Space (Inside of circle):
Haversian/Central Canal
Space (Dark flat spaces within lamellae): Lacunae
Cell (Same spot as Lacunae): Osteocyte *only occupied in a living cell
Structure (Complete circle): Osteon
Structure (Inner rings):  Lamellae
Structure (Branches from canal):   Canaliculi 

chiefteachesanatomy:

Ground Bone Prep
Tissue: BoneSpace (Inside of circle): Haversian/Central CanalSpace (Dark flat spaces within lamellae): LacunaeCell (Same spot as Lacunae): Osteocyte *only occupied in a living cellStructure (Complete circle): OsteonStructure (Inner rings):  LamellaeStructure (Branches from canal):   Canaliculi 

chiefteachesanatomy:

Ground Bone Prep

Tissue: Bone
Space (Inside of circle):
Haversian/Central Canal
Space (Dark flat spaces within lamellae): Lacunae
Cell (Same spot as Lacunae): Osteocyte *only occupied in a living cell
Structure (Complete circle): Osteon
Structure (Inner rings):  Lamellae
Structure (Branches from canal):   Canaliculi 

valdanderthal:

Fetal Ilium from Romania
-aged between 38-40 weeks, seen with a non-specific periosteal reaction
Source: abbeygailclaire

valdanderthal:

Fetal Ilium from Romania

-aged between 38-40 weeks, seen with a non-specific periosteal reaction

Source: abbeygailclaire

malformalady:

Diseased skull
Photo credit: Jennifer Walker
More on my Blogspot

malformalady:

Diseased skull

Photo credit: Jennifer Walker

More on my Blogspot

theolduvaigorge:

corporisfabrica:

Annotated radiographs of the hands of an adult (above) and a child (below)

From childhood, the bones of the hand undergo major development. Note the changes in position and size among the bones of the wrist as well as the joining of the phalanges to their proximal epipheses (seen below as dark, narrow bands adjacent to each bone in the fingers of the five-year-old).

See if you can spot something unusual in one of the radiographs…

Illustration from Cunningham’s Manual of Practical Anatomy, 7th Edition (1920) 

Such different terminology!

cheshicat:

Check out tab #dimorphism #primates #baboons #skulls #faunal #smithsonian #naturalhistory #dc #washington (at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History)

cheshicat:

Check out tab #dimorphism #primates #baboons #skulls #faunal #smithsonian #naturalhistory #dc #washington (at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History)

shared 2 months ago with 139 NOTES · (@drkrislynn) · source
#ayyyyy #primatology #osteology
theolduvaigorge:

Peking Man!

theolduvaigorge:

Peking Man!

stevenjohnhodges:

Black + White Lino cut series. 210 x 297 mm.

scienceyoucanlove:

In China, world’s first successful 3D-printed shoulder and collar bone implants have been performed In Xi’an, China, the capital of Shaanxi province, 3D-printed titanium prostheses were successfully implanted into three patients suffering from cancerous bone tumors. The procedures took place on March 27 and April 3 this year and the patients are currently in good condition and recovering with their new, 3D-printed bone replacements: a collar bone, a shoulder bone, and the right ilium of the pelvis.One of the three patients, a 20-year-old woman, was diagnosed a year ago with Ewing’s sarcoma in her right collar bone. Ewing’s sarcoma is a type of small, round, blue-celled tumor. The second patient also suffered from this disease in her right scapula or shoulder bone.And the third patient was diagnosed with cancer in the right ilium of the pelvis. These patients all had malignant tumors which could be life threatening if not removed. Eventually, the hospital decided that operations were needed to remove the tumors and replace the affected bones. This is where 3D printing technology comes in.A clavicle or collarbone replacement is a difficult procedure because of the complexity of the bone. With 3D-printing technology, it was possible to avoid some complications involved in the traditional procedure. Computer imaging was used to design a collarbone in the exact size and shape of the patient’s original bone. The 3D bone design was printed using laser sintering technology which fused titanium powder into the exact shape of the bone. This process produces a strong, customized titanium implant which ensures the implant fits well in the patient’s body. Infections and loosening and can be prevented in this way and lead to better health and functionality for the patient.Full article:http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140603-in-china-world-first-successful-3d-printed-shoulder-and-collar-bone-implants.html
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

In China, world’s first successful 3D-printed shoulder and collar bone implants have been performed 

In Xi’an, China, the capital of Shaanxi province, 3D-printed titanium prostheses were successfully implanted into three patients suffering from cancerous bone tumors. The procedures took place on March 27 and April 3 this year and the patients are currently in good condition and recovering with their new, 3D-printed bone replacements: a collar bone, a shoulder bone, and the right ilium of the pelvis.

One of the three patients, a 20-year-old woman, was diagnosed a year ago with Ewing’s sarcoma in her right collar bone. Ewing’s sarcoma is a type of small, round, blue-celled tumor. The second patient also suffered from this disease in her right scapula or shoulder bone.

And the third patient was diagnosed with cancer in the right ilium of the pelvis. These patients all had malignant tumors which could be life threatening if not removed. Eventually, the hospital decided that operations were needed to remove the tumors and replace the affected bones. This is where 3D printing technology comes in.

A clavicle or collarbone replacement is a difficult procedure because of the complexity of the bone. With 3D-printing technology, it was possible to avoid some complications involved in the traditional procedure. 

Computer imaging was used to design a collarbone in the exact size and shape of the patient’s original bone. The 3D bone design was printed using laser sintering technology which fused titanium powder into the exact shape of the bone. This process produces a strong, customized titanium implant which ensures the implant fits well in the patient’s body. Infections and loosening and can be prevented in this way and lead to better health and functionality for the patient.

Full article:
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140603-in-china-world-first-successful-3d-printed-shoulder-and-collar-bone-implants.html

source 

asylum-art:

Alan John Herbert: “The Body”

Alan John Herbert‘s The Body has only one flaw, it is too brief. It is such a beautiful series–brilliant even. The two mediums, illustration and photography, partake in a wonderful waltz, gliding across your psyche without missing a beat.

yesallthescience:

These are some of the exhibit pieces I saw at the National Museum of Health and Medicine. The museum was amazing when it came to their medical specimens. Their old medical equipment and the world’s biggest microscope collection was cool too.

theolduvaigorge:

To 3D or Not to 3D, That Is the Question: Do 3D Surface Analyses Improve the Ecomorphological Power of the Distal Femur in Placental Mammals?

  • by Francois D. H. Gould

"Improvements in three-dimensional imaging technologies have renewed interest in the study of functional and ecological morphology. Quantitative approaches to shape analysis are used increasingly to study form-function relationships. These methods are computationally intensive, technically demanding, and time-consuming, which may limit sampling potential. There have been few side-by-side comparisons of the effectiveness of such approaches relative to more traditional analyses using linear measurements and ratios. Morphological variation in the distal femur of mammals has been shown to reflect differences in locomotor modes across clades. Thus I tested whether a geometric morphometric analysis of surface shape was superior to a multivariate analysis of ratios for describing ecomorphological patterns in distal femoral variation. A sample of 164 mammalian specimens from 44 genera was assembled. Each genus was assigned to one of six locomotor categories. The same hypotheses were tested using two methods. Six linear measurements of the distal femur were taken with calipers, from which four ratios were calculated. A 3D model was generated with a laser scanner, and analyzed using three dimensional geometric morphometrics. Locomotor category significantly predicted variation in distal femoral morphology in both analyses. Effect size was larger in the geometric morphometric analysis than in the analysis of ratios. Ordination reveals a similar pattern with arboreal and cursorial taxa as extremes on a continuum of morphologies in both analyses. Discriminant functions calculated from the geometric morphometric analysis were more accurate than those calculated from ratios. Both analysis of ratios and geometric morphometric surface analysis reveal similar, biologically meaningful relationships between distal femoral shape and locomotor mode. The functional signal from the morphology is slightly higher in the geometric morphometric analysis. The practical costs of conducting these sorts of analyses should be weighed against potentially slight increases in power when designing protocols for ecomorphological studies" (read more/open access).

(Open access sourcePLoS ONE 9(3): e91719, 2014)