dynamicafrica:

In Photos: Juba Technical High School, 2013 by Espen Eichhöfer.

Located in the capital city of the continent’s youngest country, Juba Technical High School (JTHS) is the only one of its kind in the South Sudan. It offers three years of high school course work and technical studies after which students who graduate are prepared to further their studies at a tertiary institution. As of 2011, 25% of the student body were girls.

At a time where in Nigeria, Boko Haram has and continues to threaten access to education for many in the north of the country, and as the crisis in South Sudan worsens, I can’t help but worry about how misplaced the ‘Africa rising’ rhetoric in the media is today - especially in regards to prospects and opportunities for African youth based in Africa. When we live on a continent where 65% of us are below the age of 35, and over 35% are between the ages of 15 and 35 years, but access to quality education is a constant and at times overwhelming battle for many, where does that leave the future of our continent? In instances where some have access to education, the difference in quality between public and private institutions is highly disturbing and a serious cause for concern.

Despite reports of economic progress from all over the continent, unemployment rates in many African nations still remains high and especially so in the youth bracket. The many natural resource-based industries we celebrate such as oil and mining produce few jobs for locals with multinational corporations often favouring foreign employers for high-level positions.

After reading Adichie’s Americanah and, more recently, watching the web series An African City, I became increasingly frustrated with the singular diaspora returnee rhetoric that seems to paint a picture of near immediate employment success for those of us that return home. For many who do not have the benefit of dual citizenship or connections, by way of nepotism, the job landscape in many African countries remains brutal, regardless of your qualifications. I know far too many young qualified Africans, living on the continent, who remain unemployed and often underemployed. As push comes to shove, the best alternative is to seek or further ones education abroad using that as a segue to starting life in a place where the pastures are hopefully greener - something more stringent immigration policies worldwide make all the more difficult, leaving us with fewer and fewer opportunities and options.

Whether or not African governments will rise to the occasion and address this urgent situation of education and youth employment that some have deemed a potential ‘ticking time bomb' remains to be seen. Restless and increasingly frustrated youth with none or very little access to basic resources is, to put it very casually, not a good look for the continent.

Further reading: Africa’s youth: a “ticking time bomb” or an opportunity?

ghadeel:

Jana Romanova a Russian photographer captures couples in their sleep to explore their cultural attitude inside their families. Since she didn’t want them to pose she had to stick around their house till they fall asleep deeply and she would take the picture at 5-6 am. The project was named “Waiting” as they are parents to be.


"when people don’t really care about their appearance and one can see their attitude to each other and to this life that is growing inside their family."

allthingsprimate:

Chimp photography by Gabi Guiard. These pictures are just a few of some amazing shots taken at the Chimpanzee Sanctuary in Kenya. 

ravedeath93:

Blood Visions - Jay Reatard

ravedeath93:

Blood Visions - Jay Reatard

Mia Jane-Harris creates absolutely stunning close-up photographs of medical specimens of human cadavers in her series “Your Corpse is Beautiful” and shows us just how beautiful death can be.

thejunglenook:

stunningpicture:

A 44 year old Orangutan hand.

Tim Flach “More Than Human” Series (x)

thejunglenook:

stunningpicture:

A 44 year old Orangutan hand.

Tim Flach “More Than Human” Series (x)

scienceyoucanlove:

PLEASE check out this AMAZING photographer, Ami Vitale (click her name to link to her facebook) and her work to bridge gaps between cultures and save the critically endangered animals in between. Also it’s the final day for her IndieVoices campaign so please consider supporting it! It’s only $1545 away from the stretch goal. Click here to learn more about it: https://indievoic.es/projects/project_home/36/D

Oh and don’t forget to follow her here on tumblr

wolftea:

The patterning language of bone

historyechoes:

From New York Times Article - Rejecting Stereotypes, Photographing ‘Real’ Indians by Whitney Richardson that highlights Photographer Matika Wilbur’s Project 562. 562 is the number of federally recognized American Indian Tribes.

I was struck by the sheer number of tribes in the United States. This number does not even include a good number of tribes who are recognized by states or who are petitioning for recognition.

Top: Mary Evelyn. Tribe: Ohkay Owingeh and Isleta Pueblos.

Bottom: Tatanka Means. Tribes: Oglala Lakota, Omaha and Navaj.

bone-lust:

The Modern Anatomical Venus at Leiden’s Museum Boerhaave - Image Fotocredits: Koen Hauser, photography Hair and Make up, Luise van Huisstede, Model Georgina Verbaan
Just a few weeks ago, the new exhibition Amazing Models, on the Emotional, Medical and Cultural History of Anatomical Models opened at Leiden’s Boerhaave Museum. More info - http://www.museumboerhaave.nl/english/
Is it fashion, is it a glamor, or is it anatomy? In fact it’s all three. This modern day anatomical Venus , in style of the famous anatomical models from the Viennese Josephinum museum is a portrait of Dutch actress Georgina Verbaan.
She was photographed by Koen Hauser who has a large interest in anatomy, and is well known for this anatomy series. He combined an image of an original wax model from the Museum Boerhave collections with a glamorous photo of the model, thus reconstructing an image of the time when female anatomical models where not only about the anatomy of the body. Skilled hands of Florentine waxmodellers delivered beautiful, sensual and elegant models of the female body.

bone-lust:

The Modern Anatomical Venus at Leiden’s Museum Boerhaave - Image Fotocredits: Koen Hauser, photography Hair and Make up, Luise van Huisstede, Model Georgina Verbaan

Just a few weeks ago, the new exhibition Amazing Models, on the Emotional, Medical and Cultural History of Anatomical Models opened at Leiden’s Boerhaave Museum. More info - http://www.museumboerhaave.nl/english/

Is it fashion, is it a glamor, or is it anatomy? In fact it’s all three. This modern day anatomical Venus , in style of the famous anatomical models from the Viennese Josephinum museum is a portrait of Dutch actress Georgina Verbaan.

She was photographed by Koen Hauser who has a large interest in anatomy, and is well known for this anatomy series. He combined an image of an original wax model from the Museum Boerhave collections with a glamorous photo of the model, thus reconstructing an image of the time when female anatomical models where not only about the anatomy of the body. Skilled hands of Florentine waxmodellers delivered beautiful, sensual and elegant models of the female body.

historicaltimes:

Romanian revolution, December, 1989

Album

hifivesforall:

soundlyawake:

golden-zephyr:

apihtawikosisan:

5centsapound:

Chino Otsuka : Imagine Finding Me 

Chino Otsuka uses photography and video to explore the fluid relationship between the memory, time and photography. At age 10 she moved from Japan to the United Kingdom to attend school. Her experience of becoming familiar with a new place, a different language and new customs while she was developing her adolescent identity has profoundly shaped her work in photography, video and writing. Her series Imagine Finding Me consists of double self-portraits, with images of her present self beside her past self in various places she has visited. As Otsuka says: “The digital process becomes a tool, almost like a time machine, as I’m embarking on the journey to where I once belonged and at the same time becoming a tourist in my own history.”  - via AGO

I am unexpectedly weepy looking at this.

gosh that’s… moving in a really gentle kind of “mother your inner child” way…

It’s so good that I ALMOST SCROLLED PAST IT because I assumed they were just regular pictures

this is so cool

moshita:

Men looking at an xray of a skeleton, 1868
Bernard Hoffman
LIFE Magazine

moshita:

Men looking at an xray of a skeleton, 1868

Bernard Hoffman

LIFE Magazine

Hey Everyone!  

wedigthedirt:

wedigthedirt:

I’ve entered a history, archaeology and heritage themed photo contest through Past Preservers. I have entered this photo in the competition (taken while I was attending field school): image

Kilfenora Cathedral after the Storm

Kilfenora, County Clare, Ireland

If you like this photo, please like it on the competition’s Facebook page!

I would really appreciate your help! Thanks!

Thanks for all the likes so far everyone! The contest is only open until Sunday Dec. 1, and I would really appreciate it if you could help me out even more! If you haven’t voted for my photo yet, please follow the above link, and click “Like”! Thanks!