cheshicat:

Check out tab #dimorphism #primates #baboons #skulls #faunal #smithsonian #naturalhistory #dc #washington (at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History)

cheshicat:

Check out tab #dimorphism #primates #baboons #skulls #faunal #smithsonian #naturalhistory #dc #washington (at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History)

shared 5 days ago with 74 NOTES · (@drkrislynn) · source
#ayyyyy #primatology #osteology
faunachimps:

After looking through her breakfast bag, Tatu chose to eat her bowl of cereal first!

Après avoir fair le tour de son sac à dejeuner, Tatu décide enfin de commencer avec son bol de céreals! #faunachimps #sanctuary #tatuchimpanzee #caregiverpics #breakfast #yum

faunachimps:

After looking through her breakfast bag, Tatu chose to eat her bowl of cereal first!

Après avoir fair le tour de son sac à dejeuner, Tatu décide enfin de commencer avec son bol de céreals! #faunachimps #sanctuary #tatuchimpanzee #caregiverpics #breakfast #yum

faunachimps:

After looking through her breakfast bag, Tatu chose to eat her bowl of cereal first!

Après avoir fair le tour de son sac à dejeuner, Tatu décide enfin de commencer avec son bol de céreals! #faunachimps #sanctuary #tatuchimpanzee #caregiverpics #breakfast #yum

faunachimps:

After looking through her breakfast bag, Tatu chose to eat her bowl of cereal first!

Après avoir fair le tour de son sac à dejeuner, Tatu décide enfin de commencer avec son bol de céreals! #faunachimps #sanctuary #tatuchimpanzee #caregiverpics #breakfast #yum

alphacaeli:

I went to the Melbourne zoo over the weekend and took a million photos, so here’s a couple of my favourites from the Primates.

  1. Gorilla gorilla
  2. Symphalangus syndactylus
  3. Varecia variegata
  4. Mandrillus sphinx
  5. Nomascus leucogenys
  6. Cebus apella
  7. Colobus guereza
  8. Saimiri boliviensis
thejunglenook:


Chimpanzees Prefer African and Indian Music Over Silence
Although previous studies have shown that chimps shun Western music, a new study out of Yerkes suggests that they rather prefer the different rhythms found in Indian and West African tunes!
“Our objective was not to find a preference for different cultures’ music. We used cultural music from Africa, India and Japan to pinpoint specific acoustic properties,” explained study co-author Dr. Frans de Waal. “Past research has focused only on Western music and has not addressed the very different acoustic features on non-Western music.”
The study authors go on to state that “although Western music, such as pop, blues, and classical, sound different to the casual listener, they all follow the same musical and acoustic patterns. Therefore, by testing only different Western music, previous research has essentially replicated itself”
For example, a typical Western song may have one stressed (strong) beat for every three unstressed (weak) beats, an Indian raga may have one stressed beat for every 31 unstressed beats! So by including a wider range of music in the study design, these results could be the first to show that chimpanzees have a preference for particular rhythmic patterns!
Music was played for 40 minutes every morning for 12 days at Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The researchers noted that chimps would spend more time in areas where they could clearly hear the African and Indian music,  but they would retreat to the quieter areas when Japanese taiko music (which shares rhythmic characteristics with Western music) was played.
Dr. de Waal suggests that these preferences could be related to the chimps’ own rhythm use. “Chimpanzees may perceive the strong, predictable rhythmic patterns as threatening, as chimpanzee dominance displays commonly incorporate repeated rhythmic sounds such as stomping, clapping, and banging objects.”

Journal Reference:
Mingle, M. E., Eppley, T. M., Campbell, M.W., Hall, K., Horner, V., & de Waal, F. B. M. (2014, June 23). Chimpanzees Prefer African and Indian Music Over Silence. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xan00000032 (x) (press release)

thejunglenook:

Chimpanzees Prefer African and Indian Music Over Silence

Although previous studies have shown that chimps shun Western music, a new study out of Yerkes suggests that they rather prefer the different rhythms found in Indian and West African tunes!

“Our objective was not to find a preference for different cultures’ music. We used cultural music from Africa, India and Japan to pinpoint specific acoustic properties,” explained study co-author Dr. Frans de Waal. “Past research has focused only on Western music and has not addressed the very different acoustic features on non-Western music.”

The study authors go on to state that “although Western music, such as pop, blues, and classical, sound different to the casual listener, they all follow the same musical and acoustic patterns. Therefore, by testing only different Western music, previous research has essentially replicated itself”

For example, a typical Western song may have one stressed (strong) beat for every three unstressed (weak) beats, an Indian raga may have one stressed beat for every 31 unstressed beats! So by including a wider range of music in the study design, these results could be the first to show that chimpanzees have a preference for particular rhythmic patterns!

Music was played for 40 minutes every morning for 12 days at Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The researchers noted that chimps would spend more time in areas where they could clearly hear the African and Indian music,  but they would retreat to the quieter areas when Japanese taiko music (which shares rhythmic characteristics with Western music) was played.

Dr. de Waal suggests that these preferences could be related to the chimps’ own rhythm use. “Chimpanzees may perceive the strong, predictable rhythmic patterns as threatening, as chimpanzee dominance displays commonly incorporate repeated rhythmic sounds such as stomping, clapping, and banging objects.”

Journal Reference:

Mingle, M. E., Eppley, T. M., Campbell, M.W., Hall, K., Horner, V., & de Waal, F. B. M. (2014, June 23). Chimpanzees Prefer African and Indian Music Over Silence. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xan00000032 (x
(press release)

faunachimps:

Sophie taking a nap on a rainy Friday morning. 
Sophie profite de ce matin pluvieux pour faire une petite sieste. #faunamonkeys #sophiemonkey #sleepy #caregiverpics

faunachimps:

Sophie taking a nap on a rainy Friday morning.
Sophie profite de ce matin pluvieux pour faire une petite sieste. #faunamonkeys #sophiemonkey #sleepy #caregiverpics

shared 2 weeks ago with 7 NOTES · (@faunachimps)
#omg #lil baby!!! #primatology
biomorphosis:

A family of Bonnet Macaques shading from the rain.

biomorphosis:

A family of Bonnet Macaques shading from the rain.

gibboncenter:

Elwood spent the day with his mom and was so tired and comfortable that he fell asleep in her lap.

theolduvaigorge:

To 3D or Not to 3D, That Is the Question: Do 3D Surface Analyses Improve the Ecomorphological Power of the Distal Femur in Placental Mammals?

  • by Francois D. H. Gould

"Improvements in three-dimensional imaging technologies have renewed interest in the study of functional and ecological morphology. Quantitative approaches to shape analysis are used increasingly to study form-function relationships. These methods are computationally intensive, technically demanding, and time-consuming, which may limit sampling potential. There have been few side-by-side comparisons of the effectiveness of such approaches relative to more traditional analyses using linear measurements and ratios. Morphological variation in the distal femur of mammals has been shown to reflect differences in locomotor modes across clades. Thus I tested whether a geometric morphometric analysis of surface shape was superior to a multivariate analysis of ratios for describing ecomorphological patterns in distal femoral variation. A sample of 164 mammalian specimens from 44 genera was assembled. Each genus was assigned to one of six locomotor categories. The same hypotheses were tested using two methods. Six linear measurements of the distal femur were taken with calipers, from which four ratios were calculated. A 3D model was generated with a laser scanner, and analyzed using three dimensional geometric morphometrics. Locomotor category significantly predicted variation in distal femoral morphology in both analyses. Effect size was larger in the geometric morphometric analysis than in the analysis of ratios. Ordination reveals a similar pattern with arboreal and cursorial taxa as extremes on a continuum of morphologies in both analyses. Discriminant functions calculated from the geometric morphometric analysis were more accurate than those calculated from ratios. Both analysis of ratios and geometric morphometric surface analysis reveal similar, biologically meaningful relationships between distal femoral shape and locomotor mode. The functional signal from the morphology is slightly higher in the geometric morphometric analysis. The practical costs of conducting these sorts of analyses should be weighed against potentially slight increases in power when designing protocols for ecomorphological studies" (read more/open access).

(Open access sourcePLoS ONE 9(3): e91719, 2014)

The Risk of Disease to Great Apes: Simulating Disease Spread in Orang-Utan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) and Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) Association Networks 

anthropologyadventures:

gibboncenter:

Boo is the newest addition to the GCC family! She was born nearly three months ago and is a healthy pileated gibbon.

radivs:

'Dialogue' by Olga Gladysheva
© Olga Gladysheva Do not remove the credit!

radivs:

'Dialogue' by Olga Gladysheva

© Olga Gladysheva Do not remove the credit!
shared 1 month ago with 303 NOTES · (@p-rimate) · source
#primatology #Gorilla #bffs

theolduvaigorge:

Harvard’s Damning Report on Marc Hauser’s Fraud Charges

  • by David Dobbs

Ever since Marc Hauser’s 2011 resignation from Harvard amid findings of scientific misconduct, observers, critics, colleagues, and defenders have argued about Just How Bad His Behavior Was or Wasn’t. Harvard’s refusal to release its full report encouraged this, since people could speculate freely about the actual evidence behind the findings. Did he commit minor or common transgressions that the school inflated because it didn’t like him? Did Harvard give into a media frenzy? Or were the findings, as some Hauser doubters alleged, actually conservative?

All this mattered and matters not just because Hauser’s work on primate cognition had made him a sort of emblem of flashy psych science. It also mattered because, as Boston Globe reporter Carolyn Johnson recently put it,

“Hausergate” became a window into the mechanics of research fraud and the tense internal politics of a university that was investigating one of its best-connected figures.

People will long argue about how badly Hauser cheated, but they’ll have more evidence to draw on now that Johnson, continuing her strong reporting on this issue, has obtained a full copy of the Harvard in-house report through a Freedom of Information Act request. Both her resulting story and the full (redacted) report paint a rather damning picture.

The report describes a thorough, detailed, and careful investigation. For instance, when Hauser suggested that someone had doctored a videotape of his research that provided some particularly damning evidence, Harvard had two external firms examine it for signs of tampering; they found none. In other cases, the Harvard investigators found that Hauser had changed values in data — the tweaking known as falsification. Only fabrication, the outright invention of evidence, is considered worse; systemic falsification is a very close second” (read more).

(Source: Neuron Culture)