womenwhokickass:

#tw: death #tw: sexual abuse #tw: rape #tw: rape culture #tw: abuse
Aboriginal Day of Action in Toronto- Watch at >http://t.co/pbSsCcIG1jGrassroots committee Ontario in conjunction with aboriginal awareness month presents: GLOBAL AWAKENING OF ALL NATIONS!The Grass Roots Committee-Ontario is organizing a response to the deaths of two Aboriginal women in Toronto. This is, “an immediate response to questionable circumstances to the death of two native women in the Toronto area,” according to GRC organizer John Fox, the father of one of the deceased women. The rally will call attention to the ongoing issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and the role police play in Canada. 
Read some of the references attached below: Anonymous New map tracks missing and murdered Aboriginal women>http://bit.ly/12tJHOFWhen asked about allegations of sexual abuse, rape and murder of women by RCMP police, Stephen Harper said report it to the police and “just get on and do it” This is after both the RCMP and Stephen Harper refused a national public inquiry into missing and murdered women. Former B.C. Mountie says her sexual harassment complaint from within the force is being muzzled by the Harper government >http://bit.ly/11LA5PuVIDEO: Stephen Harper on Sexual Abuse of Women “Just Get On And Do It” >http://bit.ly/10XTUwMPrime Minister Stephen Harper has brushed off renewed calls for a national public inquiry into missing and murdered women http://bit.ly/15dvIMORCMP won’t call inquiry into allegations of abuse of women>http://bit.ly/14SAb6pRCMP raped, abused B.C. girls, human rights watchdog alleges in reporthttp://natpo.st/11GgeSB“Prime Minister Stephen Harper told the House of Commons that Human Rights Watch and others should “just get on and do it”— provide detailed information to the police so that they can investigate allegations of police mistreatment. His comment ignores the lack of meaningful accountability for police misconduct and fear of police retaliation that prevents indigenous women and girls from reporting mistreatment, Human Rights Watch said.” http://bit.ly/14V9SN0Rights group slams Harper for telling Aboriginal women to ‘get on and do it ‘ with reporting alleged abuse by RCMP to Police http://natpo.st/15g65e9EVENT PAGE : MORE INFO/PHOTOS>http://www.facebook.com/events/441849772549830/ Livestream video courtesy of Civilian Media Dot TV

womenwhokickass:

    

Aboriginal Day of Action in Toronto- Watch at >http://t.co/pbSsCcIG1j

Grassroots committee Ontario in conjunction with aboriginal awareness month presents: GLOBAL AWAKENING OF ALL NATIONS!

The Grass Roots Committee-Ontario is organizing a response to the deaths of two Aboriginal women in Toronto. This is, “an immediate response to questionable circumstances to the death of two native women in the Toronto area,” according to GRC organizer John Fox, the father of one of the deceased women. The rally will call attention to the ongoing issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and the role police play in Canada. 

Read some of the references attached below: 

Anonymous New map tracks missing and murdered Aboriginal women>http://bit.ly/12tJHOF

When asked about allegations of sexual abuse, rape and murder of women by RCMP police, Stephen Harper said report it to the police and “just get on and do it” This is after both the RCMP and Stephen Harper refused a national public inquiry into missing and murdered women. 

Former B.C. Mountie says her sexual harassment complaint from within the force is being muzzled by the Harper government >http://bit.ly/11LA5Pu

VIDEO: Stephen Harper on Sexual Abuse of Women “Just Get On And Do It” >http://bit.ly/10XTUwM

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has brushed off renewed calls for a national public inquiry into missing and murdered women http://bit.ly/15dvIMO

RCMP won’t call inquiry into allegations of abuse of women
>http://bit.ly/14SAb6p

RCMP raped, abused B.C. girls, human rights watchdog alleges in reporthttp://natpo.st/11GgeSB

“Prime Minister Stephen Harper told the House of Commons that Human Rights Watch and others should “just get on and do it”— provide detailed information to the police so that they can investigate allegations of police mistreatment. His comment ignores the lack of meaningful accountability for police misconduct and fear of police retaliation that prevents indigenous women and girls from reporting mistreatment, Human Rights Watch said.” http://bit.ly/14V9SN0

Rights group slams Harper for telling Aboriginal women to ‘get on and do it ‘ with reporting alleged abuse by RCMP to Police http://natpo.st/15g65e9

EVENT PAGE : MORE INFO/PHOTOS
>http://www.facebook.com/events/441849772549830/ 

Livestream video courtesy of Civilian Media Dot TV

BREAKING: North Dakota becomes first state to ban all abortions 

hidden-agender:

And before people are like “lololol North Dakota who lives there anyway?”

You know what particular population North Dakota is higher than most in?

Native Americans.

And Native women have astronomical rates of violence and rape against them.

So basically people who dismiss North Dakota don’t give a fuck about these women.

apihtawikosisan:

nitanahkohe:

screenshot from drafting my newest map project; 50 smiling faces of missing/murdered indigenous women from west of Edmonton. it’s important to me to see actual human faces on maps portraying this kind of violence, and more than anything i wanted to showcase photos of the women smiling because i think it’s one of the few ways to begin to grasp how beautiful & unique these women are. 

People need to see that our sisters and daughters and mothers and aunties and grandmothers and cousins are human beings that have been taken from us. The ability to see them in the abstract is in great part what allows this violence to happen in the first place. They are dehumanised, and this is the result. Projects like this help reassert their humanity, kinanaskomitin mistahi for this.

apihtawikosisan:

nitanahkohe:

screenshot from drafting my newest map project; 50 smiling faces of missing/murdered indigenous women from west of Edmonton. it’s important to me to see actual human faces on maps portraying this kind of violence, and more than anything i wanted to showcase photos of the women smiling because i think it’s one of the few ways to begin to grasp how beautiful & unique these women are. 

People need to see that our sisters and daughters and mothers and aunties and grandmothers and cousins are human beings that have been taken from us. The ability to see them in the abstract is in great part what allows this violence to happen in the first place. They are dehumanised, and this is the result. Projects like this help reassert their humanity, kinanaskomitin mistahi for this.

‎”In the event that you are watching me scream about abortion online, you should know that SB134, HB1037 (Fetal Pain Bill) and HB1098 (the Fetal Heartbeat Bill) have NO EXEMPTIONS FOR RAPE, INCEST, OR LIFE OF THE MOTHER. Also, in case you’re wondering, Arkansas grants rapists PATERNITY RIGHTS. This means a few things:

1.) If the fetus is not viable, women will have to CARRY THEM TO TERM, which is an undue psychological and physical burden.
2.) If the mother is dying, the physician will be criminalized for performing a late-term abortion.
3.) Abortion will be illegal after 6 weeks (way before most people know they’re pregnant). Women will start to die again through self-inflicted abortions.
4.) Given that men make more money in the state of Arkansas, rapists will often get CUSTODY of their children or full visitation rights.

If this seems humane, then you should probably de-friend me. Like, now.”

-Dr. Lisa Corrigan

pulled from someone on my facebook

who i love

(via curiousmeans)

As someone who has spent the last several years of her life focused on Reproductive Rights activist work in Arkansas and Reproductive Rights research within the academy, I AM FUCKING PISSED.

As a sexual assault survivor, I AM FUCKING PISSED.

As a woman, I AM FUCKING PISSED.

This is ridiculous.

Fuck you, Arkansan Republicans. Or just Republicans in general.

(via thenewwomensmovement)

I’m not even from Arkansas, and I’M FUCKING PISSED!!!

(via thepoliticalfreakshow)

·ROMA·VIVAT·: lavenderlabia: theconcealedweapon: Everything Men’s Rights Activists... 

lavenderlabia:

theconcealedweapon:

Everything Men’s Rights Activists label as “female privilege” is really patriarchy backfiring against men.

The gender-specific rule that men shouldn’t hit women is caused by the misogynistic belief that women are fragile.

The belief that men can’t…

In 30 years observations, Jane Goodall never saw one rape among the chimpanzees, our closest primate cousins. Though it’s not possible to draw firm conclusions about human behaviour from animals, Goodall’s findings, and many other recent studies, get us questioning the old myths we have about rape. One of the most persistent myths about rape is that male biology and primitive male sex urges drive men to rape. But current information indicates that rape is more a learned act of sexual violence that comes out of social beliefs that men have a right to dominate and control women. The fact that rape is learned means that we can work to change the underlying beliefs and eliminate rape from our communities. — Truth About Rape (via slutwalkseattle)

disgustinghuman:

thefirstpaganking:

The Women of Asgarda | In the Ukraine, a country where females are victims of sexual trafficking and gender oppression, a new tribe of empowered women is emerging. Calling themselves the “Asgarda”, the women seek complete autonomy from men. Residing in the Carpathian Mountains, the tribe is comprised of 150 women of varying ages, primarily students, led by 30 year-old Katerina Tarnouska. Reviving the tribal traditions of the Scythian Amazons of ancient Greek mythology, the Asgarda train in martial arts, taught by former Soviet karate master, Volodymyr Stepanovytch, and learn life skills and sciences in order to become ideal women. 

forever reblog

this could go horribly, horribly wrong

but for now, i can’t even, let me join 

Everyday Sexism At Work 

What we don’t know for certain is the cause of these facts. Countless ‘reasons’ are flung around to try to explain the disparities, from unsupported theories about gender-based skill sets, to frustratingly simplistic claims that women are to blame for not being tenacious or ambitious enough, to over-generalised stereotypes about childbirth and family life. The latter frequently fail to take into account the enormous influence of provisions for maternity and paternity leave, support for working parents and more, thus conveniently blaming parents whose careers are adversely affected instead of critiquing the system that has created this result in the first place.

None of these theories alone is sufficient to explain the enormous disparity between men and women’s professional achievements and earnings. It is likely that several of the more considered and balanced ideas may hold some merit and account for some part of the problem.

But there are other factors at play. While it may not be convenient or popular to acknowledge it, the huge number of women who have written to the Everyday Sexism Project to document their experiences of sexism in the workplace strongly suggests that this is another important influence.

Everyday Sexism Project
Everyday Sexism Twitter

lilacfawn:

I am incredibly sick of people right now

eversodarling:

decoratedskin:

whataboutthemenses:

Just last week I happened to be awake at 3 am and heard “go away, stop it” from outside my apartment window. Of course I was worried and wound up going outside with my cell phone and my pocket knife (the cell phone so I could pretend I was on it). I found a woman across the street, 18-20, somewhat drunk and trying to pull away from a guy claiming to be her boyfriend. After walking to the end of the block and back I sucked it up and stopped right next to them and asked her if she was okay. No. I asked if she knew him. Yes. I asked if he was her boyfriend. No. I asked if she wanted to go with him. No. I told her she could come with me. He wouldn’t let go of her arm and kept talking to her with the platitudes women are familiar with - come on baby, I’ll take you home, just hang out with me, we were having such a good time - and eventually he gave in after seeing I had my finger on the dial button, but he was vibrating on the spot and he was pissed. Then he kept talking to me with all the insults women are familiar with - bitch, cunt, stupid fucking slut, etcetera forever. And of course he went after her for “leading him on.” I got her in a cab from my front door and went so far as to make sure I didn’t turn on any  lights when I went inside so he wouldn’t know that my apartment was on the basement level facing the street where he was standing.

But this isn’t a problem or anything.

A few months ago I was working late shifts at work and getting off at 3 am. I only live a few blocks from there, so I was walking home. This was when there was a series of attacks against women in my neighbourhood. Not rapes, but escalating attempts to harm women, involving choking. So yes, I was on red alert. A group of five men from the bars saw me walking home. They started calling out to me - again, with all the lines women are used to (that, by the way guys, are not in the least bit attractive) - hey baby, where you goin, come on just stay and chat, a pretty thing like you shouldn’t be going home alone, where do you live. I ignored them and walked faster, and they sped up to keep up with me. Five men in their 20s. Following me home, drunk, and getting progressively angrier that I wouldn’t talk to them. “Why the fuck you being so rude? We just want to talk, quit being such a frigid bitch.” *guffaw guffaw* “Baby come on slow down, have some coffee with us.” I walked even faster, still not talking to them. I have foot and knee injuries, so this was getting really painful and I couldn’t have broken into a run if I’d tried. They thought this whole thing was quite hilarious and quite rude of me, never mind that I’m the one being followed home by drunk strangers. I finally looped a block and backtracked to the main road, which is really well-lit, and plopped myself dead centre in the middle of the ambulance-police combo that is in front of one of the bars every Saturday night without fail.

But street harassment isn’t a problem or anything.

Walking down a bright road in daylight, men lean out of car windows and honk and cheer at me and my friends. This has been happening since I was 14. Many of them are stuck at the same light we are, so we spend a good two minutes listening to them ask us to flash them. “Just show us your titties, we’ll give you each $5!”

Going to a bar and getting my ass groped at the bar as a precursor to offering to buy me a drink. I don’t know if men think this is a demonstration of their sexual abilities, or what, but it happens all the time.

Walking home from Walmart at 10pm and having a guy walk by me say “nice titties” thinking I can’t hear him because I have headphones in. Worst of all, spinning in anger and having to keep my mouth shut, because it could get a lot worse really fast.

Being “accidentally” groped on buses and trains frequently (they say they’re stumbling and that’s where their hands end up, but come on: I’m on the same vehicle, there was no jolt, and even if their was my hands don’t wind up on them), and not being able to complain without everybody thinking you’re crazy.

Dancing at a bar and having a guy slide his hand down the front of my pants. And then getting thrown out for elbowing him and shoving him away from me.

Getting told to smile by strangers (always men), and being told to cheer up, like I owe them a certain mood.

Having a guy you slept with once sit outside your house for seven hours, and then try to follow you inside while you pretend not to notice his car, and then disregard your requests through the intercom to leave you alone. And then, when you finally call the police, having the policeman call you back to say “He’s leaving, but he sounded sincerely sorry. You shouldn’t be so hard on him, he sounds like a nice guy.” Yeah, give him your home address then.

Having male customers look you up and down like you’re on the menu, and not being able to slap the customer who grabs your ass while you’re cleaning tables because you’ll be fired.

Finding out your sister’s employer felt comfortable uttering threats to punch her in the face for accusing him of being unfair, and her not feeling like she could tell anybody.

Having my male boss feel like he can touch me, rub my shoulders, call me honey and sweetheart and baby, and him being right, he can do those things, because everybody calls you oversensitive if you complain about those things.

Being followed home numerous times, both on foot and by car, being forced to talk to the guy who sits next to you on the bus for 45 minutes straight, and since I couldn’t think of a non-threatening way not to give him my phone number, I did so that I could get away. It took him a year and a half to stop calling me. Being told I’m paranoid for carrying any kind of protection, and stupid for not protecting myself, I’m a misandrist for assuming the worst of strange men, and stupid for having a conversation, I’m rude for asking men to leave me alone, and stupid and weak for not being more direct and assertive. Being told to go out and have fun more, stop being so uptight, and having that thrown in my face when something happens, because if I had some morals and didn’t advertise myself as, I don’t know, being alive or something, nothing would have happened. Being told to give him a chance and then being told to stop leading him on. Having to know all of the escape routes on my way home, and sending staff to the dumpsters in pairs. Having it be a fucking brave thing to do to stand next to a girl so she can walk away from the guy trying to bully her into going home with him.

And then having to listen to people say, “You’re exaggerating. Men aren’t like that, quit trying to see the worst in people. Men get harassed too, just ignore them and walk away. It’s the same thing.” Listening to people just step right over the fact that if woman deems a guy creepy, she’s told she’s being too critical and she needs to lower her standards, but if a man deems a woman possessive, controlling, demanding, jealous, bitchy, clingy, psycho, on her period, whiny, or outright dangerous he’s commended on his standards and congratulated on a bullet deftly dodged.

How many women does it take to bring these things to light before people stop thinking we’re crazy, over-critical bitches?

This is long but worth a read. Because it is real life for a lot of us ladies. And because if this doesn’t stop it will happen to my little girl in about 8-10 years.

This makes me so angry and sad at the same time.

standwithfreeiran:

Take Action! Demand Iran Protect Women’s Equal Access to Higher Education via United For Iran
In contravention of Iran’s constitutional and international human rights obligations, thirty-six Iranian universities have announced that 77 BA and BSc courses in the coming academic year will be “single gender” and exclusive to men. Under this new policy, Iranian women are being excluded from a broad range of studies, including English literature, hotel management, archaeology, nuclear physics, computer science, electrical engineering, industrial engineering and business management. Iranian authorities are claiming the restrictions aim to create “balance” between the genders in higher education, but leading clerics have previously expressed the real intention behind such policies: To limit the presence and activities of women in society, and curb their educational choices. Send a letter urging Iran’s Minister of Science, Research and Technology; the Higher Council of Cultural Revolution; and the deans of the 36 Iranian universities enforcing “single gender” courses to reverse these and all discriminatory policies against women
Signal Boost!

standwithfreeiran:

Take Action! Demand Iran Protect Women’s Equal Access to Higher Education via United For Iran

In contravention of Iran’s constitutional and international human rights obligations, thirty-six Iranian universities have announced that 77 BA and BSc courses in the coming academic year will be “single gender” and exclusive to men. Under this new policy, Iranian women are being excluded from a broad range of studies, including English literature, hotel management, archaeology, nuclear physics, computer science, electrical engineering, industrial engineering and business management. Iranian authorities are claiming the restrictions aim to create “balance” between the genders in higher education, but leading clerics have previously expressed the real intention behind such policies: To limit the presence and activities of women in society, and curb their educational choices. Send a letter urging Iran’s Minister of Science, Research and Technology; the Higher Council of Cultural Revolution; and the deans of the 36 Iranian universities enforcing “single gender” courses to reverse these and all discriminatory policies against women

Signal Boost!

jalwhite:

Missing Manitoba Women: Why Are Manitoba’s Aboriginal Women Going Missing?
In October 2011, Shannon Buck’s daughter disappeared.
Fourteen-year-old Lauren had taken off for a weekend or two before, but always returned to her Winnipeg home.
“I knew that something wasn’t right,” says Buck. She filed a missing persons report with the police and created posters with an online kit.
Lauren’s photo and description appeared on the Facebook page Missing Manitoba Women. Quickly it gained hundreds of shares. Two days later, it was thousands.
Then, two weeks after Buck had last seen her daughter, the phone rang. Lauren called her mom from a hotel where a woman had recognized her from the Facebook page, and stayed with the teenager until Buck could pick her up.
“I couldn’t stop hugging her,” says Buck. “It was a big relief to be able to have someone find her, take care of her and contact us and let us know where she was.”
It was also a relief for Shelley Cook, the founder of the Facebook page, who since June 2011 has dedicated her time to tracking and sharing cases of missing people in Manitoba.
Cook started the page and a blog as a university project, but kept it going after her course ended, enlisting the help of two friends. She doesn’t even have Internet access at home, posting new cases from her phone for the page’s almost 6,000 followers to share.
“I wanted to humanize [these women],” says Cook. She says that missing aboriginal women are too often portrayed as nothing more than sex workers, addicts or otherwise ‘at-risk’ persons. Cook tries to work with families to gather personal details and images that aren’t mugshots.
Missing Manitoba Women does not restrict the cases to aboriginal women — or even solely to women — but that’s who makes up the majority of the cases.
It’s estimated that 75 aboriginal women have disappeared in Manitoba in the last two decades. Across Canada, The Native Women’s Association of Canada says more than 600 women have gone missing or been murdered since 1990.
Aboriginal women are three-and-a-half times more like to experience violence and for younger women, are five times more likely to die from violence than non-aboriginal women in Canada. And Manitoba, where the highest percentage of aboriginal women live, has seen more than its share of tragedy.
In June, Shawn Lamb was arrested and charged in the serial murders of three aboriginal Winnipeg women: Carolyn Sinclair, Tanya Jane Nepinak and Lorna Blacksmith. Lauren was missing during the time between when police allege he killed Nepinak and Sinclair.
“The community knew who this person was and that there was a serial killer,” says Buck. “They didn’t listen to us and it cost three women their lives … at least three women.”
Buck says communication between the aboriginal community and police can be shaky at best, with families of missing and murdered women sometimes hearing about the fate of a loved one from the media before police.
In May 2011, the RCMP and Winnipeg Police launched Project Devote, a joint task force that narrowed down dozens of cases to eight missing persons and 20 murders dating back to 1961 on which to focus. Twenty-seven out of 28 of these victims are women, and many are aboriginal.
While the task force identifies the common factor in these cases as “[victims] of high or extremely high risk due to lifestyle,” nowhere in Project Devote’s mission is the word “aboriginal” mentioned. This fact has not escaped the notice of the community, and criticism has been swift.
“It is our hope that these investigations will produce leads that will provide these families with much needed relief and closure,” Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, said in a news release. “Until the province of Manitoba recognizes the problem of missing and murdered people is worse and getting worse in the Indigenous community, Project Devote will remain limited in scope and outcome.”
Cook says she’s glad that something, anything, is being done, but she’s not convinced Project Devote can get the job done.
“I’m a little skeptical,” she says. “I’m hoping for the best, but I’m not thinking this will be the be all and end all.”
RCMP and police have also been quiet on the Project’s progress, denying interviews and updates to media, including the Huffington Post Canada.
Niki Ashton, MP for Manitoba’s Churchill riding and a vocal advocate for a national inquiry, says by not addressing aboriginal women specifically, we still don’t know the full scope of the problem.
“It’s completely inadequate to say a general database of missing people, which is what federal government committed to, is a response to dealing with missing and murdered aboriginal women. It simply isn’t,” says Ashton.
“Some of the positive initiatives that were part of finding a solution, like Sisters In Spirit, were not only not supported, but they were actually cut,” she says.
Sisters In Spirit, a Native Women’s Association of Canada initiative to build awareness of missing and murdered women, was working on gathering information to start a database, but was defunded in 2010.
In the mean time, grassroots initiatives like Missing Manitoba Women are gaining a wave of new voices as discussions that were once kept inside the community are erupting into a larger dialogue.
Buck says she has always been an advocate for aboriginal women, but when it hit so close to home, she found her voice.
“The line has been crossed, I can’t be silent anymore,” says Buck. “Not only for my daughter, but for all of our daughters, all of our sisters, enough is enough.”
Whether Manitoban or not, aboriginal or not, Cook says anyone can help by simply sharing the images and stories of missing women across their own Facebook pages, as hundreds of others are already doing every time a new face appears.
“One of the best ways to help is to not turn a blind eye to it anymore. Not go home to your comfortable homes and pretend it’s not there. To stand up and to say something, and to not wait for someone else to do it,” says Buck. “Because it could be their daughter next, or their sister, or their mother.”

jalwhite:

Missing Manitoba Women: Why Are Manitoba’s Aboriginal Women Going Missing?

In October 2011, Shannon Buck’s daughter disappeared.

Fourteen-year-old Lauren had taken off for a weekend or two before, but always returned to her Winnipeg home.

“I knew that something wasn’t right,” says Buck. She filed a missing persons report with the police and created posters with an online kit.

Lauren’s photo and description appeared on the Facebook page Missing Manitoba Women. Quickly it gained hundreds of shares. Two days later, it was thousands.

Then, two weeks after Buck had last seen her daughter, the phone rang. Lauren called her mom from a hotel where a woman had recognized her from the Facebook page, and stayed with the teenager until Buck could pick her up.

“I couldn’t stop hugging her,” says Buck. “It was a big relief to be able to have someone find her, take care of her and contact us and let us know where she was.”

It was also a relief for Shelley Cook, the founder of the Facebook page, who since June 2011 has dedicated her time to tracking and sharing cases of missing people in Manitoba.

Cook started the page and a blog as a university project, but kept it going after her course ended, enlisting the help of two friends. She doesn’t even have Internet access at home, posting new cases from her phone for the page’s almost 6,000 followers to share.

“I wanted to humanize [these women],” says Cook. She says that missing aboriginal women are too often portrayed as nothing more than sex workers, addicts or otherwise ‘at-risk’ persons. Cook tries to work with families to gather personal details and images that aren’t mugshots.

Missing Manitoba Women does not restrict the cases to aboriginal women — or even solely to women — but that’s who makes up the majority of the cases.

It’s estimated that 75 aboriginal women have disappeared in Manitoba in the last two decades. Across Canada, The Native Women’s Association of Canada says more than 600 women have gone missing or been murdered since 1990.

Aboriginal women are three-and-a-half times more like to experience violence and for younger women, are five times more likely to die from violence than non-aboriginal women in Canada. And Manitoba, where the highest percentage of aboriginal women live, has seen more than its share of tragedy.

In June, Shawn Lamb was arrested and charged in the serial murders of three aboriginal Winnipeg women: Carolyn Sinclair, Tanya Jane Nepinak and Lorna Blacksmith. Lauren was missing during the time between when police allege he killed Nepinak and Sinclair.

“The community knew who this person was and that there was a serial killer,” says Buck. “They didn’t listen to us and it cost three women their lives … at least three women.”

Buck says communication between the aboriginal community and police can be shaky at best, with families of missing and murdered women sometimes hearing about the fate of a loved one from the media before police.

In May 2011, the RCMP and Winnipeg Police launched Project Devote, a joint task force that narrowed down dozens of cases to eight missing persons and 20 murders dating back to 1961 on which to focus. Twenty-seven out of 28 of these victims are women, and many are aboriginal.

While the task force identifies the common factor in these cases as “[victims] of high or extremely high risk due to lifestyle,” nowhere in Project Devote’s mission is the word “aboriginal” mentioned. This fact has not escaped the notice of the community, and criticism has been swift.

“It is our hope that these investigations will produce leads that will provide these families with much needed relief and closure,” Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, said in a news release. “Until the province of Manitoba recognizes the problem of missing and murdered people is worse and getting worse in the Indigenous community, Project Devote will remain limited in scope and outcome.”

Cook says she’s glad that something, anything, is being done, but she’s not convinced Project Devote can get the job done.

“I’m a little skeptical,” she says. “I’m hoping for the best, but I’m not thinking this will be the be all and end all.”

RCMP and police have also been quiet on the Project’s progress, denying interviews and updates to media, including the Huffington Post Canada.

Niki Ashton, MP for Manitoba’s Churchill riding and a vocal advocate for a national inquiry, says by not addressing aboriginal women specifically, we still don’t know the full scope of the problem.

“It’s completely inadequate to say a general database of missing people, which is what federal government committed to, is a response to dealing with missing and murdered aboriginal women. It simply isn’t,” says Ashton.

“Some of the positive initiatives that were part of finding a solution, like Sisters In Spirit, were not only not supported, but they were actually cut,” she says.

Sisters In Spirit, a Native Women’s Association of Canada initiative to build awareness of missing and murdered women, was working on gathering information to start a database, but was defunded in 2010.

In the mean time, grassroots initiatives like Missing Manitoba Women are gaining a wave of new voices as discussions that were once kept inside the community are erupting into a larger dialogue.

Buck says she has always been an advocate for aboriginal women, but when it hit so close to home, she found her voice.

“The line has been crossed, I can’t be silent anymore,” says Buck. “Not only for my daughter, but for all of our daughters, all of our sisters, enough is enough.”

Whether Manitoban or not, aboriginal or not, Cook says anyone can help by simply sharing the images and stories of missing women across their own Facebook pages, as hundreds of others are already doing every time a new face appears.

“One of the best ways to help is to not turn a blind eye to it anymore. Not go home to your comfortable homes and pretend it’s not there. To stand up and to say something, and to not wait for someone else to do it,” says Buck. “Because it could be their daughter next, or their sister, or their mother.”

glasskaleidoscope:

TW: sexual assault.

One in three Native American women will be sexually assaulted in her lifetime; 86% of these sexual assaults are perpetrated by non-native men. In two weeks the United States congress will resume session for a short while before they break - probably until the elections. Please call your representatives and senators and tell them to pass the full VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) which includes ALL provisions for Native American Women. The version of this bill currently sitting in house does not include those provisions for Native women - they have been stripped away. This is an incredibly important bill that has the potential to help the indigenous women of Canada as well. 
Please pass this along.

loveyourrebellion:

This Is My Body

This Is My Body is a short film project that is a passionate, full-throated expression of the fundamental, inalienable, universal rights of women. The project is a response to the attacks on women’s health and reproductive rights, and general bodily autonomy, that have occurred throughout this year.

What I think gives the film its added touch behind the powerful message is that the director, surprisingly enough, is a male. His name is Jason Stefaniak and is a thesis student in the NYU Grad Film program. His impetus for the project was the desire to see a country and world that respects and empowers women, such as his mother, grandmother, aunts, girlfriend, and sister.

The video was shot in one day in a studio in New York with about 5 crew members and borrowed equipment and was funded through a Facebook fundraising campaign. We’ve spent no real money on advertising and the entire distribution plan was created and executed by Jason, as well as a few volunteers.

youwillnotdeny:

aaaand who in positions of power cares/is willing to do anything other than holding a sham of an inquiry???

youwillnotdeny:

aaaand who in positions of power cares/is willing to do anything other than holding a sham of an inquiry???

girljanitor:

Sunny Clifford, a 26-year-old Pine Ridge Tribal park ranger, has launched a Change.org petition that seeks to improve the quality of women’s lives by making Plan B available—and affordable—throughout Indian Country. Just months after the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center (NAWHERC) published a startling February 2012 report, “Indigenous Women’s Dialogue: Roundtable Report on the Accessibility of Plan B as an Over the Counter (OTC) Within Indian Health Service,” Clifford’s petition is over 100,000 signatures strong and well on its way to meeting its goal of 150,000 signatures. But with just three voting days left, Clifford’s campaign greatly needs your support.

girljanitor:

Sunny Clifford, a 26-year-old Pine Ridge Tribal park ranger, has launched a Change.org petition that seeks to improve the quality of women’s lives by making Plan B available—and affordable—throughout Indian Country. Just months after the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center (NAWHERC) published a startling February 2012 report, “Indigenous Women’s Dialogue: Roundtable Report on the Accessibility of Plan B as an Over the Counter (OTC) Within Indian Health Service,” Clifford’s petition is over 100,000 signatures strong and well on its way to meeting its goal of 150,000 signatures. But with just three voting days left, Clifford’s campaign greatly needs your support.